Category Archives: Nijideka Akunyili Crosby

If you could have any artwork in the world….and other perfect summer fantasies

 

What is the one work of art that you would want to live with every day?

Isn’t this a great question to consider?  It’s quite a fun idea to explore.  Just think about it. Take your time.  I find a seemingly unending stream of memories is elicited.   I offer it as a satisfying bit of escapism this summer.  As Annie Dillard says Spend the afternoon, you can’t take it with you.

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It’s not an easy choice for me.  I acknowledge that much of the remarkable work I’ve experienced wouldn’t be easy to live with every day.  There are  size and volume constraints, of course, but tone and meaning and the intention of the work must be considered, too.  Just as we are (or ought to be) selective about choosing housemates and partners, we are sensitive to the spirit of the artwork we bring into our lives.

If you could have your portrait made by any artist, who would that be?

I especially like this question.  (Could it be because it’s so self-centred?!)  Maybe it’s because I don’t know much about portrait painting and so I have fewer choices.  Whatever the reason, it too, offers the opportunity for entertaining possibilites.

Artemisia Gentileschi?  Caravaggio?  Rembrandt?  John Singer Sergeant?  Berthe Morisot?  Njideka Akunyili Crosby?  Käthe Kollwitz?

Njideka Akunyili Crosby, I Refuse to be Invisible, 2010, artist image

Njideka Akunyili Crosby, I Refuse to be Invisible, 2010, artist image

The questions are not originally conceived, nor are these:

What is the work or art / monument / museum that changed your life?

What is the book, and what is the piece of music, that inspire you the most?

Which artist do you find most overrated?  Which artist do you find most underrated?

These questions are posed by the Frick curators on their twice a month series, The Frick Five, available on the Frick’s website.  The Frick curators, Amiee Ng and Xavier F. Salomon, conduct relaxed, remote video  conversations with other curators.  It’s fun to get a glimpse into their homes – not always the  ubitquous book shelves – and hear them speak from a personal, as well as a professional viewpoint. The stories surrounding a life-changing piece of art or monument are delivered honestly and with a measure of vulnerability.  Isn’t that what happens when we resonate with a piece of art?  As they ably explain the historical and artistic significance of the works  supporting images are provided.

It’s highly entertaining to hear art professionals discuss the ‘overrated’ artists, and very informative to hear their support and enthusiasm for an artist deserving more attention.  They are limiting  the discussion to deceased artists, and not dishing any dirt on contemporary artists – although I initially held out some hope for just such an exchange, but they are obviously more gracious, and a whole lot wiser, than me.  I’ll leave it to you to find the interview with the curator who dares to question the values attributed to certain Impressionist painters.

The music and book choices are sometimes surprising, but always charming.  Kylie Minogue, anyone?! I think I would find it impossible to choose only one book, or one single piece of music.  Just like one piece of art, how does one choose?

 

 

 

 

Stopped in my tracks….

So, there I was, enjoying the Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco, wandering from Walker Evans to Louise Bourgeoise  when I was stopped in my tracks by this work of art…..

Wedding Portrait, 2012, Njideka Akunyili Crosby

It was such a compelling piece that a complete stranger and I struck up a conversation.  We were both excited about the image, (acrylic paint, pastel,coloured pencil, marble dust, transfers and custom fabric on paper) and wanted to share our enthusiasm and admiration for Wedding Portrait.

If you’re interested, take a few moments to look at my photo of the artwork (which, of course, doesn’t do it justice.)  Notice the shapes, the layering, the negative spaces…..it’s a work beautifully composed.  It’s intriguing to have the face of the (presumed) groom absent, even though the other figures focus on him.

Click here for a link to Akunyili Crosby’s website.  There are many more images to savour there.

The Baltimore Museum of Art opened a solo show of her work today!   Front Room:  Njideka Akunyili Crosby / Counterparts closes March 18, 2018. That gives us plenty of time to plan a trip to Maryland.