Category Archives: Tamarind Institute

Print Month Update AND an Amazing Artist You’ve Probably Never Heard Of….

Have you been indulging a bit, or a lot, in Print Month?

Click here for the E / AB (Online) Fair and here for the IFPDA viewing rooms.  The viewing rooms are wonderful: informative, and visually satisfying.  They really are treasure troves, and lots more fun than regular on-line shopping!  Just think:  Helen Frankenthaler, Carmen Herrera, Judy Pfaff, KiKi Smith, Marion MacPhee, Joan Miró, Rembrandt, Paulson Fontaine Press, Zea Mays Printmaking….and please, watch the video about Louise Nevelson at Tamarind Institute.

As you can imagine, The Art Caravan’s (in person) 2019 visit to NYC for Print Week was jam-packed with great art viewing. Seeing Emma Nishimura‘s work at the International Print Center New York was one of the (many) highlights.

https://www.ipcny.org

Shifting Views, 2013, Emma Nishimura

Yes!  This incredible piece, depicting the landscape near Slocan, British Columbia, is composed of cut pieces of the artist’s prints,  wrapped by hand around the rods.

Shifting Views, (detail), 2013, Emma Nishimura

Shifting Views, (detail),2013, Emma Nishimura

In this exhibition, Paper Borders, Nishimura used the forced relocation of her Japanese-Canadian grandparents to an internment camp in rural Canada during the years of World War II as source material.  (More than 22,000 Canadians of Japanese descent were required to live in camps in British Columbia.  They were allowed one suitcase per person, and their homes and property were confiscated, and sold.  Here is a brief summary of the Japanese internment in Canada.)

Nishimura’s technical skills in printmaking are exceptional.  Note the exquisite etching details she executes by hand.  The lines in the Constructed Narrative series are composed of text from historical and familial documents / papers.

Collected Stories, (detail) Emma Nishimura

Collected Stories, (detail) Emma Nishimura

Constructed Narratives 2013-ongoing series, Emma Nishimura

Constructed Narratives 2013-ongoing series, Emma Nishimura

Nishimura’s An Archive of Rememory is a most engaging series.  Furoshiki are traditional Japanese cloth used to carry everyday items, as well as gifts.  Nishimura has made furoshiki out of her etchings of internment camp and family photos.

An Archive of Rememory, 2016-ongoing, Emma Nishimura

An Archive of Rememory, 2016-ongoing, Emma Nishimura

An Archive of Rememory, 2016-ongoing, Emma Nishimura

An Archive of Rememory, 2016-ongoing, Emma Nishimura

The artworks are wrapped, and knotted into paper furoshiki, to carry the memories of a Canadian family and their community.  Her furoshiki appear simple, but are complex works.  Nishimura’s  sculptured vessels are made up of visual representations of memories of a community denied their homes and possessions.

furoshiki from An Archive of Rememory, photo etching and photo gravure on handmade flax and abaca

furoshiki from An Archive of Rememory, photo etching and photo gravure on handmade flax and abaca

It’s a lot to absorb, I know.  It’s disturbing source material.  Nishimura’s  expressions of her ideas are complex,  creative and beautiful.  If you’re interested in more information, and images of her work, I highly recommend her website .