Emily Carr: DFP

After walking through the brightly lit rooms of  Entangled:  Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting  (previous post) at the Vancouver Art Gallery I wandered into a cozy, dimly lit space displaying Emily Carr paintings in the show   空/Emptiness: Emily Carr and Lui Shou Kwan.

The paintings are gorgeous:  the Vancouver Art Gallery has some of the best examples of Carr’s work I’ve seen.  They are damn fine paintings–bold, strong, studied.

Grey, 1931-32 Emily Carr

Grey, 1931-32 Emily Carr

untitled (Tree on a Rocky Profile) 1922-25 Emily Carr

untitled (Tree on a Rocky Profile) 1922-25 Emily Carr

A Young Tree, 1931 Emily Carr

A Young Tree, 1931 Emily Carr

This is work to be experienced in person. Many of us have seen her art reproduced on mugs, greeting cards and book bags and think we know it.   I have thought, “Oh, yeah.  Emily Carr.  Eccentric west coast woman painting trees.”  Then I encounter some of these paintings and think, “Wow. Gorgeous. Lush. Remarkable…….. I wish she hadn’t had such a struggle to make a living, and could have spent more time painting.”  (Sad and sobering facts:  Carr could not always make a living from her artwork, and spent much time and energy for many years managing tenants in a rental house and engaging in other schemes to earn money.  In 2015 one of her paintings sold at auction for $1.53 million. Click here for a National Post article about the sale.)

It seems I have a short memory, for I have expressed the very same views about her paintings in other posts I’ve written.  Click here and here to read other brief postings about her works.

untitled, 1931-32 Emily Carr

untitled, 1931-32 Emily Carr

Abstract Tree Forms, 1931-32 Emily Carr

Abstract Tree Forms, 1931-32 Emily Carr

Emily might be horrified to know her images are on greeting cards, magnets and bookmarks.  Or maybe she would have laughed at the irony of it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 thoughts on “Emily Carr: DFP

  1. Diane McGifford

    Thanks Terry. All are grand but I particularly was taken with “Grey.” Perhaps because I’ve never seen a Carr painting that wasn’t vibrant with colour. I would love to pop over to Vancouver for a look but we are headed south to Mexico on Friday. Adios, Diane

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